The Burning Room by Michael Connelly (2014)

burningroomHarry Bosch is near retirement and is assigned to cold cases with a young but very bright partner who has received favorable publicity from her last assignment. He and his young partner find themselves investigating two unusual cases simultaneously. The first involves the recent death of a victim shot 10 years before and the second case, the death of children in a fire from which his partner, as a child, survived. The cases would appear unrelated except for an anonymous phone call (placed by Harry?) on the department tip line.

The young partner and the reader have the benefit of Harry’s experience on a fast-paced tour involving a grisly autopsy, an arrest of a loner survivalist, political and departmental pressure, along with lots of sound but risky police investigation. At the end, could there be penance and redemption for a wrongdoer, and does Harry keep his job for yet another case?

Check out Michael Connelly’s latest Harry Bosch novel The Burning Room (for another take, check out The New York Times review). And if you enjoy the adventures of Harry Bosch, check out our list of other popular mystery and suspense series.

I’ll Give You the Sun by Jandy Nelson (2014)

giveyouthesunAt thirteen, twins Jude and Noah are opposites: light and dark, wild and reserved, sporty and arty, but they’ve always on the same team. At sixteen, the two are hardly speaking to one another, and it becomes increasingly obvious that they are hiding more from each other than they are sharing. At thirteen, Jude is queen of the surfers and beginning to attract all of the attention of the boys, but perhaps moves a little more quickly than she can handle. Noah also meets a boy, but he’s far too afraid of being outed to the bullies at school to do much about it. His only hope is that his painting skills are good enough to get him into the special arts school in town, where he can finally be free of his tormentors and among people like himself. The twins’ mother tries to help both of her children apply for the school, but Jude becomes increasingly jealous as she feels her mother favoring Noah.

Three years later, their mother is dead—and haunting Jude. Jude interacts with the silent, angry ghost of her mother (who ruins all of her artwork) and the helpful, talkative ghost of her grandmother, bringing some magical realism to this contemporary young adult novel. As both stories unfold through alternating points of view and timelines, family mysteries are revealed, loves are won and lost, and this family is torn apart and brought back together again.

Find a copy of Jandy Nelson’s moving novel, I’ll Give You the Sun, today.

Little Mercies by Heather Gudenkauf (2014)

littlemerciesEllen is an overworked social worker with three children of her own. After a tragic accident occurs in her own family, she finds herself on the other side of the system she works for.

Ten-year-old Jenny, alone in Iowa, must rely on her street smarts to help herself.

When their lives intersect, the pair finds some unique ways to help each other. Little Mercies is a really good page turner, with characters you come to care about. Check out the latest from Heather Gudenkauf.

Alex by Pierre Lemaitre (2013)

alexThis 2013 Crime Writers International Dagger Award winner will stun you first and shock you later. A thrilling race against time story told from multiple points of view is worthy of its award.

Alex Prevost is kidnapped, beaten, suspended from the ceiling of an abandoned warehouse in a tiny cage, and left for rats to feed on. Will she die before the rats are satisfied?

Police Commandant Camille Verhoeven has nothing to go on: no leads, no family or friends of the victim, no suspects, so he tries to find out more about her or her history. Alex by Pierre Lemaitre is a very graphic and emotionally wrenching, wholly unpredictable story. A lot of twists and turns make it an unforgettable experience.

The Motherless Oven by Rob Davis (2014)

IMG_0983I grabbed this quirky graphic novel on a whim and was pleasantly surprised. Rob DavisThe Motherless Oven contains a story of friendship as three teens go on an adventure to solve the usual mysteries of life. Can someone escape their assigned death day? Where did Scarper’s robot father go?

It was the world building in this book that intrigued me the most though. Why on earth does it rain knives instead of water? Read this on a day you are FEELING WEIRD. Or ready to feel weird. Or weirder than you already feel.

 

Citizens Creek by Lalita Tademy (2014)

citizenscreekThis book is arranged in two parts: first about Cow Tom, born a slave and sold to a Creek Indian chief before he was 10 and then about his granddaughter, Rose who was born free. Tom gained his name while tending the tribe’s cows under the direction of his mentor, Old Turtle. Tom wanted more than living on someone else’s land, doing another’s bidding; he wanted marriage, a son, and most of all freedom. Both Old Turtle and Chief Yargee recognize Tom’s special skills with language and the Chief allows Tom to apply part of his earnings as a translator towards his and his family’s freedom.

Rose dearly loved her grandfather and desperately wanted to find her place as a respected member of the family, the tribe, and break the family curse of only girl babies. These stories show family and tribal commitment from black slaves and freedmen at a time of conflict and removal of tribes from the southeast into Oklahoma Indian Territory. In Lalita Tademy’s Citizens Creek, the reader can easily become involved with the characters from their loyalty to one another and their conversations about their problems and struggle to reach their goals.

Trains & Lovers by Alexander McCall Smith (2013)

trainsloversThree men and a woman share a train compartment between Edinburgh and London. From different age groups, backgrounds, and even countries, they prove it is sometimes easier to bare your soul to strangers, except for one coveted secret of an old love that is revealed only to readers. The travelers share their personal or family love stories and, oddly enough, they all involve trains. Diverse anecdotes take the reader all over England, Scotland, Australia, and the eastern part of the U.S., past and present day. The stories of Trains & Lovers get at the heart of human emotions. By the last chapter, Alexander McCall Smith may convince you to book a rail journey.

The Gigantic Beard That Was Evil by Stephen Collins (2014)

giganticbeardWelcome to Here, a perfectly egg-shaped island, completely isolated. Everything Here is perfect and peaceful, with all of the houses identical and no competition between neighbors. All of the men in Here are clean shaven, except Dave who is bald, save for a single hair on his chin that resists both plucking and shaving. One day, the hair begins to grow and grow, until Dave has a full beard, which just keeps getting bigger and bigger, until the size of it is making daily life on Here difficult, not to mention the beard is proclaimed on the news as a “portal to Hell.”

Beautifully illustrated in a black and white minimalist style, The Gigantic Beard That Was Evil by Stephen Collins is a well-considered and hilarious satire of normalcy and keeping order.